Ho-Ho-Ho-ing into Holidays 2022

 

Photo Credit: Historic Park City Alliance

By all accounts, we’ve already been blessed by a banner snow year, as evidenced by both Park City Mountain and Deer Valley Resort opening early for the first time in decades! And with a winter wonderland presenting itself throughout the Wasatch Back, I’ve compiled a list of my favorite holiday happenings from now through the New Year.

2022 Snow Globe Stroll

Historic Main Street, Park City
November 25, 2022 – January 9, 2023
All ages

Add to the festive splendor of Historic Main Street by finding the seven life-sized snow globes, each featuring a scene depicting a Christmas carol. Save a link to the map of the seven snow globes found here before you head out on your globe-seeking mission! While you’re on Main Street, be sure to bring those letters to Santa to send by Dec. 22 via the special North Pole mailbox at the top of the street.

Photo Credit: Ice Castles

Ice Castles

Soldier Hollow Nordic Center
2002 Olympic Drive, Midway
December 21, 2022 – February 4, 2023
All ages

Thanks to the super cold temps and early snow, the awe-inspiring Ice Castles in Midway is opening early for the first time this year on December 21. This frozen spectacle sells out quickly, so be sure to visit their bookings page and grab your tickets ASAP. Click here for more info.

Photo Credit: DeJoria Center

Clydesdale Wagon Rides

DeJoria Center/State Road Restaurant
970 North State Road 32, Kamas (approx. 20 minutes from Park City)
Thursday – Saturday, Dec. 8, 2022 – Jan. 6, 2023 from 5 – 7:15 p.m.
All ages

Take in the winter landscape from a Clydesdale-drawn wagon at High Star Ranch in the nearby Kamas Valley, featuring a stunning mix of ranches and Rocky Mountains. Hot cocoa and food is available before or after in the onsite Country Store & Café. Santa and Mrs. Claus will join be there on Tuesday, Dec. 20. Reservations are required, with kids ages 4-12 are $10 and adults $30. Click here to buy tickets.

Photo Credit: Park City Mountain

Silver Sky Nights

Park City Mountain, Canyons Village
Friday, Dec. 23, 4 p.m.
All ages
Park City Mountain kicks off Christmas weekend with live music, ice carving, treats, and a spectacular firework display! For more info, click here.

Photo Credit: Egyptian Theatre

Kurt Bestor

Egyptian Theatre
328 Main Street, Park City
Thursday & Friday, Dec. 22 & 23 at 8 p.m.
Saturday & Sunday, Dec. 24 & 25 at 6 p.m.
All ages

As Christmas as eggnog, Utah’s Emmy Award-winning favorite, Kurt Bestor, continues his holiday residency at the Egyptian Theatre for four nights featuring holiday favorites and original music in the beautiful, intimate confines of this historic landmark. Tickets are $30 for House Seating, $40 for Preferred Front of House seating, and $50 for Cabaret Table Seating in front of the stage. To purchase tickets, click here.

Santa Claus Visits Deer Valley Resort

Deer Valley Resort
Snow Park Lodge (2250 Deer Valley Drive South, Lower Deer Valley)
Silver Lake Lodge (7600 Royal Street, Upper Deer Valley)
Saturday, Dec. 24, 9 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.
All ages

Christmas Eve in PC means Santa’s hitting the slopes at Deer Valley Resort to take photos with all of the good boys and girls. His typical schedule is the Snow Park Lodge area from 9 – 11 a.m., and then at the Silver Lake Lodge from 12 – 1:30 p.m. For more information, click here, or call 435-649-1000.

Photo Credit: Deer Valley Resort

Deer Valley Resort Torchlight Parade

Deer Valley Resort
2250 Deer Valley Drive South, Park City
Friday, Dec. 30, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m.
All ages

Another quintessential ski town tradition is a torchlight parade, where skiers travel in formation down a ski run at dusk holding torches to create an otherworldly glow. Deer Valley Resort’s Torchlight Parade is held on Big Stick ski run (behind Snow Park Lodge) at around 6 p.m., with complimentary hot chocolate, cider and cookies served on the plaza from 5:30-7:30 p.m. Click here for more information. 

New Year’s Eve at Cast & Cut

Deer Valley Resort
268 Main Street, Park City
Saturday, Dec. 31 – 6 p.m. – 1 a.m.
21 and over

Ring in the New Year at Cast & Cut in Deer Valley during this exclusive evening of drinks, dinner and dancing The Spazmatics. The event includes a full bar, party favors and champagne toast. Dinner and dancing is $495 per person, the DAOU Lounge and dancing is $425 per person, or just get your dance on for $350 per person. For full details, click here.

Photo Credit: Heber Valley Railroad

North Pole Express

Heber Valley Railroad
450 South 600 West, Heber City
Mondays – Saturdays through Dec. 23
All ages

I’ve highlighted this delightful excursion in years past, but this year’s dates are all mostly sold out, so be sure to schedule a reminder for next year’s onsale date of June 1, 2023, to ensure you do not miss out on future opportunities. The annual attraction features a train ride to the North Pole while enjoying Mrs. Claus’ famous chocolate chip cookies and hot cocoa on the Heber Valley Railroad’s North Pole Express, plus a visit and gift from Santa himself! Available tickets and dates are listed here.

Nothing beats the holidays in Historic Park City and surrounding towns, and when you Choose Park City, you’ll learn all local faves from the Choose Park City team! Connect with Christine Grenney at 435-640-4238 or Brendan Trieb at 585-410-5536, or visit their website by clicking here.

Live PC Give PC: When Supporting our Community Supports us all

Photo credit: Park City Community Foundation

This year, Live PC Give PC – our local 24-hour day of giving – is turning 12 on Friday, Nov. 4, and my team is excited to share as much info about the event as possible to help it continue to raise even MORE funds than in previous years.

Launched in 2011 by the Park City Community Foundation (PCCF), Live PC Give PC has raised an astounding $21-million for local nonprofits. Donations of all sizes are welcomed, as it’s the cumulative nature of 1,000s of donors that make the event such a huge success. Donors can give to one nonprofit, or select multiple recipients, from this year’s list of more than 100 worthy local organizations.

The Live PC Give PC online platform makes it easy to give, with many nonprofits benefitting from “match” pledges, wherein a donor has made a pledge in advance to match every gift to that nonprofit during the event, maximizing the overall gift to that organization.  

New this year, the event’s evening party is morphing from an adult affair into an all-ages “Party Under the Stars” celebration on Town Lift Plaza from 4 – 9 p.m., still sponsored, as in years past, by the generous folks at High West Distillery. Revelers are asked to donate a minimum of $5 to any nonprofit of their choosing, don something orange, dress warmly and enjoy drinks and dancing with fellow community members.

Photo credit: Park City Community Foundation

If you’re unfamiliar with the event and looking for ways to get involved, PCCF has curated a list of 10 Ways to Participate During Live PC Give PC, including:

1.     Donate to your favorite nonprofits on Nov. 4 at Live PC Give PC, where early donations of $5 or more are accepted

2.     Share the fun by reaching out to friends and family to spread the word via phone, text, social and email

3.     Plan to attend the Party Under the Stars

4.     Volunteer to be an ambassador to your neighborhood, business or school at LivePCGivePC.org

5.     Cheer on volunteers at donation stations and street corners on the day of the event by honking, waving and giving

6.     Get the kids involved, and introduce them to philanthropy at an early age

7.     Party in your neighborhood by hosting a happy hour on Nov. 4th and invite guests to go online to donate

8.     See a film at the Jim Santy Auditorium in the Park City Library, where “The Good House” will be presented by the Park City Film Series on Nov. 4 at 7 p.m.

9.     Listen to KPCW at 91.7 FM, or stream online, for updates about the event’s progress

10.  Wear Orange to show your Live PC Give PC spirit

As in years past, we will be making donations in the name of clients we’ve worked with over the past 12 months, selecting nonprofits we feel best fit their personal charitable priorities or those they have directed us to support, and have also earmarked the following nonprofits as ones I’d like to highlight for 2022:

Photo credit: Maker Union, Derek Israelsen photographer

Maker Union 

New this year, Maker Union is a nonprofit dedicated to creating a safe and engaging workspace for adults with disabilities. Anne Peters, a longtime friend of mine and current member of the Park City School District Board of Education, created Maker Union in part to support her daughter’s journey from school to employment. The organization strives to provide opportunities for equitable employment tailored to individual skill sets within this very special workforce.

CONNECT Summit County

The mission of CONNECT Summit County is to destigmatize mental illness by creating a well-informed community with access to mental health services for everyone. They work to achieve this goal by providing free educational programming, assistance in navigating the mental healthcare system, financial assistance for therapy and access to providers and support groups. CONNECT is comprised of family members, loved ones, friends and colleagues of people struggling with mental illness, along with mental health service providers and others not directly affected by mental illness, but who recognize this as a serious challenge facing the Summit County community.

Photo credit: Youth Sports Alliance

Youth Sports Alliance

An organization that serves literally 1,000s youth in Summit and Wasatch Counties, Youth Sports Alliance (YSA) offers afterschool programming to students in elementary and middle school, keeping kids active and introducing them to sports and healthy lifestyle activities. Founded in 2002 following the Salt Lake Olympic Games with a goal of increasing participation in winter sports, the nonprofit has expanded to include not only its cornerstone Get Out and Play program, but also the ACTiV8 programs for middle and junior high students, and funding for developmental sports teams like Figure Skating Club of Park City, Ice Miners Hockey, Park City Speed Skating Club and Park City Ski & Snowboard. Scholarships are available for students who would otherwise be unable to participate, ensuring every kid is able to connect with an activity that gets them excited and active in new ways.

Photo credit: Park City Education Foundation

Park City Education Foundation

Park City Education Foundation (PCEF) is a nonprofit that supports all students and staff throughout the Park City School District (PCSD) through nearly 100 programs as part of eight key initiatives: Preschool, Elementary Visual Arts, Afterschool, Real World Learning, Educator and Student Wellness, Bright Futures, Classroom and Express Grants and the Innovation Lab. PCEF helps fill in funding gaps to ensure all students have an opportunity to reach their academic potential, and their existence in our community is one of the reasons PCSD has such amazing outcomes for students of all backgrounds. As a PCEF Board Member, the Chair of Running with Ed(ucation), and with two kiddos in Park City School District, this one is a passion for me.

Photo credit: EATS Park City

EATS Park City

The vision of EATS Park City is to create a healthier generation through food security, education, gardens & sustainability and advocacy. Founded in 2013 when community members raised concerns about the health and wellness of local youth, in the past year alone, EATS Park City has:

  • Provided more than 13,000 supplemental Backpack meals
  • Educated and empowered students at 10 local schools
  • Diverted 28,160 lbs of food waste which equals 6 metric tons
  • Purchased more than 500 lbs of local food
  • Taught more than 328 classes of empowering education
  • Partnered with 22 like-minded businesses, organizations, and school districts to make this happen
Photo credit: PC READS

PC READS

PC READS advocates for literacy in our community with a focus on ensuring that all students successfully learn to read. They promote early identification of struggling readers, effective reading interventions and appropriate classroom accommodations. Their team of parents, educators, students and volunteers also provide resources and support to families with struggling readers, particularly those identified as dyslexic.

While these six nonprofits are a few near and dear to my own heart, I’m confident anyone willing to participate in giving through Live PC Give PC will find at least one deserving nonprofit that resonates with them, and that’s just one more reason why so many people Choose Park City.

Connect with Christine Grenney at 435-640-4238 or Brendan Trieb at 585-410-5536, or visit their website by clicking here to learn about the many ways to connect with the local community through nonprofits and the events they hold throughout the year.

The 2022-23 Ultimate Utah Season Pass Guide

Photo credit: Deer Valley Resort

With the recent cold snap giving the tops of nearby peaks a dusting of white, thoughts naturally turn to the upcoming ski season and the hope that the Farmer’s Almanac is spot on in its prediction that this will be a banner snow year beginning with a heavy snowfall the third week of October! You can access the entire season’s predictions for about $10/year, giving you a leg-up on planning the days to visit PC or, if you’re local, when the “Powder Flu” might hit your household.


Getting Geared Up

One of the best parts of preparing for the upcoming season actually starts this month, with an impressive slate of ski swaps scheduled throughout the Wasatch Back and in the Salt Lake Valley. The locals’ favorite Park City Ski & Snowboard Swap is traditionally held in November, and though they haven’t posted their dates yet, you can stay in-the-know for all the swaps by bookmarking the following Ski Utah page:  https://www.skiutah.com/resources/utah-ski-swap


Local Resort Rundown

Deer Valley Resort

Season: Dec. 3, 2022 – April 16, 2023 (conditions permitting)

My family’s wintertime home base, Deer Valley Resort, continues to be one of the highest-rated resorts in the U.S. We enjoy the “Deer Valley Difference,” which extends to all corners of the resort in terms of customer service, dining, caliber of runs and lodging.

With it’s “Deer Locals” passes, Deer Valley Resort provides opportunity for qualifying Utah residents to still be able to hit the famous corduroy slopes at significant savings:

PASS NAMEPRICE BEFORE THE OCTOBER PRICE DEADLINE**PER DAY PRICINGPURCHASE 
Adult 5 Pass
(Valid 7 days per week, subject to holiday blackouts)
$660$132BUY NOW 
 
Adult Midweek 5 Pass (Monday – Friday)$525$105BUY NOW 
Young Adult 5 Pass (13-22)$560$112BUY NOW 
Child 5 Pass (5-12)$405$81BUY NOW 

Full Season Passes are outlined in the table below:

PASS NAMEBefore October 2022 Price Increase DeadlineDeer Valley Season Pass + IKON PassDeer Valley Season Pass + IKON Base Pass
Adult (23-64 years)$2,675$2,975$2,924
Senior (65+ years)$1,995$2,295$2,244
Young Adult (13-22 years)$1,655$1,955$1,904
Child (5-12 years)$750$1,050$999
College Student$1,875$2,175$2,124
Military Season Pass$1,875$2,175$2,124
Tot Season Pass (4 and under)$185$485$434

For the second year, Deer Valley is offering “First Tracks” on specific Wednesdays, allowing season pass holders to access the mountain 30 minutes early on Jan. 25, Feb. 15, and March 22, 2023. Three additional First Tracks days are scheduled for both Deer Valley and IKON season pass holders on Jan. 11, Feb. 8, and March 1, 2023.

Season Pass holders also receive discounts on Friends & Family passes that can be redeemed online, a Monday-Friday complimentary day ticket at Alta, Brighton, and Snowbird, discounts at Deer Valley-owned restaurants and retail outlets, and a complimentary 2023 Summer Season Pass if a 22/23 Full Season Pass is purchased before October deadline.

Another option is the Mid-Week Season Pass, with access Monday through Friday (excluding 12/26/2022 – 1/2/2023) for just $1,465 before the October deadline.

The Ikon Pass also offers days of skiing at Deer Valley, along with other local resorts like Snowbasin, Snowbird, and Alta, with more info available at ikonpass.com.

To purchase passes or learn more, click here.

Photo credit: Park City Mountain

Park City Mountain

Opening Date: Nov. 18, 2022

New for the upcoming ski season, Park City will limit daily lift ticket sales to prioritize the mountain experience for guests – a practice Deer Valley Resort has long implemented at their resort. Season Passholders will not be affected by this limit, nor will their benefit tickets, including Ski with a Friend and Buddy tickets. New amenities are also being rolled out for the season, including a new ski beach stretching from the Red Pine Gondola to the Orange Bubble Express featuring heated sidewalks, fire pits and seating areas.

With a Season Pass discount available until October 7, 2022, now is the time to lock in Epic Pass prices online by clicking here. Pass options include the full Epic Pass, with no holiday blackout dates and access to all Vail Resorts-owned properties for $879 for ages 13 and older, and $448 for children ages 5-12 (there is no teen option, unlike the Epic Local Pass). The Epic Local Pass, which excludes holidays (though half-price day passes are available for blacked-out dates), is $655 for ages 19 and older, $530 for teens ages 13-18, and $311 for children. The Park City Youth Pass – with no blackout dates, but good only at Park City Mountain and not at other Vail Resorts – is $352 for kids ages 5-12. Kids four and younger are eligible for a free Epic pass – just go to any ticket window and they’ll hook you up.

One of the best values, especially for visitors who book in advance, is the multi-day Epic Passes, ranging from one to seven days, which is good at most Vail resorts in the U.S. and at Whistler/Blackcomb, and start at $99 for one day for skiers ages 13 and older, and $50 for one day for children ages 5-13. For every day added, the price per day decreases, with the daily price for the seven-day pass just $83 ($579 total), but do note that holidays are excluded.

Benefitting active duty and retired military who served at least 20 years, the Epic Military Pass is just $155, and includes all dependents.

All passes offer 20% discounts on food, retail, lessons and rentals, plus seven days of unrestricted skiing or snowboarding at both Snowbasin and Sun Valley for full Epic Pass holders (Epic Local Pass holders receive two days with restricted dates).

Woodward

Now a part of the Park City winter sport fabric, Woodward is located along I-80 between Kimball Junction and Summit Park, and offers a small-mountain experience for skiers and snowboarders, with half-pipe and park access, plus lessons that typically cost less than at the larger resorts. While they haven’t yet included their 2022-23 winter operations info online, keep an eye on their site for info coming out soon!

Photo credit: Snowbird

Snowbird & Alta

Snowbird Opening Date: to be announcedAlta Opening Date: Nov. 18, 2022

With terrain that challenges both newbies and expert skiers and boarders, Snowbird is a favorite among many dyed-in-the-wool powderhounds but can be accessed from Park City in less than an hour’s drive time.

This year, Snowbird is promising to plant a tree for every pass sold. In conjunction with One Tree Planted, they’ve engaged in tree-planting efforts in national parks throughout the U.S.

There’s a pass for everyone at Snowbird, including the all-in Summit Pass with no blackout dates (see prices below), the Ten-2-Share Pass with 10 days of unlimited access to the Tram and chairlifts for $699 (can be shared with family and friends), the Flex-4 Tix for four days of unlimited skiing/riding for $449 (perfect for trying out the mountain), or the Mountain Collective Pass for two days at each of 24 destinations for $579 for adults.

Summit Pass Type2021-22 Pass Price
Summit Adult$1,299
Summit Senior (65+)$959
Summit Young Adult (19-25)$959
Summit College/Medical Resident/Military$959
Summit Teen (13-18)$569
Summit Youth (7-12)$379
Summit 6 & Under$69
Summit 4-Pack (2 adults + 2 kids 18 & under)$2,599
Pricing is tax exclusive – tax rate of 7.25% not including Ikon Bass Pass add-on benefit.
Prices and benefits are valid through September 28, 2022.

The Alta-Bird pass is also a great way for skiers (no snowboarders allowed at Alta) to experience the best of both iconic resorts, with prices as follows:

Alta-Bird Pass Type2021-22 Pass Price
Alta-Bird Adult$1,849
Alta-Bird Senior (65+)$1,649
Alta-Bird Young Adult (18-25)$1,649
Alta-Bird Military$1,649
Alta-Bird Teen (13-17)$1,009
Alta-Bird Youth (7-12)$729
Alta-Bird 6 & Under$169
Alta-Bird 4-Pack (2 adults + 2 kids 17 & under)$3,899
Pricing is tax exclusive – tax rate of 7.25% not including Ikon Base add-on benefit.
Prices and benefits are valid through September 28, 2022.
Photo credit: Ski Utah

Ski Utah 4th, 5th & 6th Grade Passport

You read that right! Ski Utah has decided to outdo themselves and their amazing youth passport by expanding it to include 4th grade, and providing every grade with three days at each of Utah’s 15 resorts for just $49! In previous years, 5th graders received three days, and 6th graders received just one day at each resort (still an amazing value), but to extend it means so many more young skiers and riders will get the chance to experience more terrain than ever before. They’ve also added an online pass usage/availability tracker, and definitely keep in mind that there are holiday restrictions at all resorts for the week between Christmas and New Year’s, MLK weekend, and President’s weekend. If you have kids in grades 4-6 like I do, I recommend you make this year one for the books by also getting the Ski Utah Yeti Pass for $669 for yourself, which provides one ticket at each of Utah’s 15 resorts to help you introduce your kiddo to the breadth of resort offerings across Utah.

The Yeti Pass can also help you explore the other easily-accessible resorts in Northern Utah, which include Beaver, Brian Head, Brighton, Cherry Peak, Eagle Point, Nordic Valley, Powder Mountain,  Solitude, Sundance, and Snowbasin. Ski Utah helps you break down all the passes, including which resorts are part of which collective, here.

Utah’s fabled “Greatest Snow on Earth” is one of the many reasons so many people Choose Park City. Connect with Christine Grenney at 435-640-4238, or visit her website by clicking here to learn about the many mountain properties providing easy access to each of the state’s resort communities.

‘Tis the Season for Property Taxes

Did you know … the practice of collecting property taxes dates back to ancient Egypt, Persia and China, where taxes were collected from farmers based on projected crop yield? William the Conqueror continued the practice in England during the Middle Ages, where Lady Godiva rode her horse while naked through town in protest.

Property values have skyrocketed throughout Summit and Wasatch counties, which could warrant an increase in your tax bill this year, but we don’t recommend taking the Lady Godiva approach to contesting your property tax notice, which should have arrived within the past few weeks. If you haven’t received your notice yet, you can find out how to connect with the Summit County Assessor’s Office by clicking here, or the Wasatch County Assessor’s Office here.

Although Utah’s property tax rate is ranked 12th lowest in the U.S. and is considered to be one of the 10 best states for property taxes, any increase to a monthly budget can put a pinch on some households and businesses already saddled with increasing costs for fuel and other goods.  While we know the benefit property taxes provide to the community via public services such as schools, parks, fire, and police protection, it’s always wise to ensure you’re not paying more than your fair share.

Utah’s property taxes vary depending on whether a property is a primary or secondary residence. That’s why it’s important to pay attention to the notice to ensure your property is categorized properly.

Below, you’ll find two property tax notices from Summit County: One for a primary residence and one for a secondary residence. Secondary residences are taxed at the full assessed value, while primary residences are taxed at 55% of assessed value:

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If your notice shows taxes based on 100% and you live in the home full-time, or rent out the property full-time (but do not rent it nightly for 14 or more nights each year), then you should fill out the Signed Statement of Primary Residence and file it with the Assessor’s office before September 15th. Signed statements received after September 15th will be considered in the following year. Visit the Summit County Assessor site by clicking here, or the Wasatch County Assessor site here, to learn more about residency exemptions. Depending on the value of your property, you could save thousands of dollars.

Another way to save money on property taxes is to appeal your assessed value. The assessed value of your property is determined by the assessor’s office based on the prevailing local real estate market conditions

If you think the amount on your notice is unreasonable, I can work with you to help determine whether the assessed value is fair. The National Taxpayers Union Foundation recommends the following steps in appealing your assessment:

❏ Make sure all deductions to which you are entitled were granted

❏ Determine any deadlines or legal requirements for filing the appeal or for claiming any deductions. Comply with the legal requirements and don’t miss these deadlines!

❏ Check the accuracy of the assessor’s math, description of your property, work papers, and record card for your property.

❏ Consult with any experts who might be of assistance (see my notes on this below)

❏ Locate at least five comparable properties (with my help)

❏ Make adjustments for differences between your property and comparables

❏ Check your property’s assessment against the assessments of the comparables

❏ If your assessment is unfair, make an informal appeal to the assessor first. If the assessor doesn’t agree, file your appeal.

❏ Attend an appeals board hearing to get a feel for the process.

❏ Prepare a written summary of your case and rehearse your presentation.

 Prepare Your Appeal
You must file your appeal within 45 days of receiving your property tax notice. For Summit County, this can be accomplished by either submitting an electronic Board of Equalization Appeal Form via the county’s online portal or downloading a PDF version to fill out and send to the Summit County Board of Equalization.

The Wasatch County primary residence exemption form can be found by clicking here.

You must include a copy of your property tax notice, along with any evidence, such as an appraisal, sales comparable to your property or MLS – Multiple Listing Services – data to support your appeal. Contact me if you would like help with this.Decisions depend on the availability and workload of Board of Equalization Appeal Officers, and could take several weeks. Once a decision is reached, you can expect to receive a “Notice of Determination.” If your appeal is denied, you cannot appeal your final property tax bill when it is received in November. To contact the Summit County Assessor’s Office, call 435-336-3257, or visit them at the county courthouse in Coalville, at 60 North Main Street. The Assessor can be emailed at [email protected].For Wasatch County, call 435-654-3221, or visit them at 25 North Main Street in Heber.If you have any questions or need help finding comparable properties to support your appeal, please reach out to me sooner than later. I’m happy to walk you through the art of how to appeal your property taxes anytime, but keep the September deadline in mind!

More people than ever have decided to Choose Park City, and have made Summit or Wasatch counties their permanent home. Connect with Christine Grenney at 435-640-4238, or visiting her website by clicking here to learn more about the benefits of moving to the Wasatch Back!

Summer Camp Sign Ups

It’s that time of year – when parents begin that mad scramble for summer camp slots, so we’re put together our annual compilation of available camps throughout Summit and Wasatch counties, along with a few worth noting in the Salt Lake Valley. Some summer camp schedules are pending from providers, but many will be opening for registration in the next few weeks, so mapping out your strategy to provide the most stupendous summer for your kiddos is imperative!

All Summer Long

Photo Credit: Basin Recreation

Basin Recreation Summer Blast Day Camp
(Starts at Trailside Park and Ends at Ecker Hill daily)
(435) 655-0999

Basin Recreation typically offers a full-summer option with their Summer Blast Day Camp, beginning the first full week of June (this year, that would be June 6) but their information has not yet been posted. Each year, the Summer Blast Camp separates groups into ages 6-7, 8-9, and 10-12, and features themed weeks filled with games, arts and crafts, weekly visits from the Kimball Art Center and EATS, plus sports and swimming. Last year, registration opened in mid-April, so look for information to come out soon on the Basin Recreation website by clicking here, check out their Facebook page here, or call the Field House at 435-655-0999.  

Photo Credit: Park City Recreation

Park City Recreation Summer Day Camp
1354 Park Avenue (City Park)
Park City, UT  84060
435-615-5401 (435-615-5440 when camp is in session)

Park City Recreation operates a full-day, full-summer program out of their camp headquarters in City Park. As of last summer, the program gives priority registration to residents and workers within the 84060 zip code, and parents have until March 1 to provide proof of residency or employment by emailing [email protected], or dropping documentation off at the PC MARC. Starting on March 15 at 6 a.m., full-summer and daily registration opens online and in-person for campers who have fulfilled the priority registration requirements or was a full-summer camper in 2021. Registration for full-summer, daily and add-on activities opens to the public on April 1. Camp is held daily from 8 a.m. – 6 p.m. and includes arts and crafts, sports, and games. Add-on activities include four-day golf lessons, swimming lessons, and skateboarding. Park City Recreation also offers a Counselor in Training (CIT) program for teens ages 13-15. The program focuses on leadership and job skills while working side-by-side with Summer Day Camp staff and campers. Applications for CIT are due on Monday, May 2nd, and can be found here. For additional info, call 435-615-5401, visit their Facebook page here, or visit them online by clicking here.

Photo Credit: Deer Valley Resort

Deer Valley Resort Summer Adventure Camp
2250 Deer Valley Drive South (Snow Park Lodge)
Park City, UT  84060
435-645-6648

While registration information for the 2022 iteration of Deer Valley Resort’s Summer Adventure Camp has not yet been posted, in years past, this much-loved-among-locals camp has been headquartered out of Snow Park Lodge and featured hiking, mountain biking, and SUP, along with games, puzzles, arts & crafts, and field trips. As a state-licensed center, infants as young as two months were welcome, with options available for kids up to 12 years of age. Last year’s camp began the first full week of June (which would be the week of June 6 for this year), and offered five categories of campers: Mountaineers (ages 7-12), Explorers (ages 5-6), Trekkers (ages 3-4), Grasshoppers/Little Ramblers/Ramblers (ages 12 months-2 years) and Sunflowers (ages 2-11 months). Stay up-to-speed by bookmarking their website here, or checking out their Facebook page regularly.

Photo Credit: YMCA of Northern Utah

YMCA’s Park City Summer Day Camp
4501 UT-224
Park City, UT  84098
801-839-3379

YMCA’s Park City Summer Day Camp registration opened on February 14 and offers a reignited daily excursion focus, which includes weekly swimming and trips to the organization’s Camp Roger in the Uinta Mountains above Kamas, where archery, hiking and other outdoor pursuits will be on the agenda. Headquartered out of Park City Community Church (behind Park City Nursery on S.R. 224), the YMCA day camp is open to ages 5-12, and runs from 7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. Some of this year’s weekly themes that begin on June 6 include “Young Scientists,” “Color Runs Wild,” Super Hero Week,” “Game Show Mania,” “Great Outdoors,” and “Fear Factor.” Click here to learn more, or call 801-839-3379.

Recreation & Enrichment

Photo Credit: Woodward Park City

Woodward Park City
3863 Kilby Road
Park City, UT  84098
435-222-2378

Woodward Park City offers indoor and outdoor weeklong camps throughout the summer for kids ages 7-17 in sports specialties that include mountain bike, skateboard, scooter, BMX, multi-sport, parkour and cheer. Each session also includes access to all Woodward state-of-the-art facilities (mountain parks, action sports parks and indoor action sports hub), professional coaching, lunch, positive relationship building, arts and crafts, and recreational games and activities. Camps are available by-the-week from June 6 through August 8, from 9 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. daily. Reservations are open now, and they’re offering $200 off one week of camp if booked by March 31. Visit the Woodward website here for more details and to register.  

Photo Credit: Young Riders

Young Riders Camps
(Locations throughout Park City)
435-640-8642

Founded in 1996, the Young Riders Youth Cycling program offers once a week and weeklong camps from 9 a.m. – 12 p.m. beginning June 6, and provides opportunities for riders ages 5 – 14. Nineteen weeklong camps are available throughout the summer for every level of rider, including Pee Wee (ages 5 – 7), Beginner Youth (ages 7 – 9), Beginner Junior (ages 10 – 13), Intermediate (ages 9 – 13) and Advanced (ages 10 – 14). Their Once a Week programs differ from the Young Riders weeklong camps in that classes meet once per week throughout the summer, with participants signing up for a specific class depending on their age and ability level (they will ride and progress with the same kids and the same coaches over a ten-week period, with rides programmed to gradually challenge participants as summer progresses). Registration opens on Wednesday, March 23 at 7 a.m., and camps are limited to 10 riders, so they fill up quickly. Be sure to bookmark the registration page to get your kids ready to roll!

Photo Credit: Summit Community Gardens

Summit Community Gardens
4056 Shadow Mountain Drive (off Old Ranch Road)
Park City, UT  84098
[email protected]
Summit Community Gardens’ enriching summer camps offer an immersed-in-nature experience featured a different gardening theme each week, with hands-on activities involving partner organizations like EATS and Recycle Utah. This year’s themes include “Art in the Garden,” “Build your own Garden,” “Chopped w/EATS,” “Week in the life of a farmer,” and “Cycle the Cycles w/Recycle Utah.” Butterfly Members are able to register beginning on March 2, while all others can sign up starting March 16. To learn more, and receive an alert when camp registration opens, click here.

Photo Credit: Summit Land Conservancy

Summit Land Conservancy Outdoor Explorers and Little Explorers Camp
1650 Park Avenue, Ste. 200
Park City, UT  84060
435-649-9884

This year’s Summit Land Conservancy Outdoor Explorers Summer Camps feature seven week-long camps for kids who love to be outside! Camps are for kids ages 7 – 12 years old, run from 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. daily, and run from June through August. Each week features “Mountain Bike Monday,” “Trail Trekking Tuesday,” “Water Adventure Wednesday,” “Treasure Hunt Thursday” and “Farmer Friday.” General registration opens on March 31 at 12 p.m.  For more information, contact Caitlin at 435-640-9884 or [email protected].

Photo Credit: Swaner Preserve & EcoCenter

Swaner Preserve & EcoCenter
1258 Center Drive
Park City, UT  84098
435-649-1767

Swaner Preserve & EcoCenter offers popular weeklong camps beginning June 14, and include both half-day and full-day options. Because camps sell out quickly, they offer early registration on March 18 at 9 a.m. for Sandhill Society members and March 21 for Swaner Family-level members, with general registration opening on March 23. Camps are offered as half day options for kids in grades kindergarten through 6th, or full-day options for kids in 1st through 6th grade, with a Counselors in Training program for kids in grades 7 & 8. Some of the weekly themes include ”EcoExplorers,” “Down to a Science,” Predator Power,” and “Watershed Explorers,”  Click here to check them out in advance of the registration date. They’re also hiring camp counselors right now, so click here to learn more about how kids entering grades 9-12 next fall can apply.

Photo Credit: PC Codes

PC Codes
Shepherd of the Mountains Lutheran Church (base of Canyons Resort, though unaffiliated with the church)
4051 UT-224
Park City, UT 84098
[email protected]

Entering its 4th year of offering technology summer camps to kids ages 8-14, PC Codes endeavors to provide engaging, hands-on, creative and fun learning opportunities for students. Each summer camp involves students learning about a concept in computer science, practicing that concept, and then working with other campers to create and display and end-of-week capstone project. Every coding ability from beginner to expert is accommodated, with the goal of allowing all campers to feel challenged while having fun. Morning and afternoon half-day camps are available, with the option to have students stay for lunch to create an all-day experience. Camps run for five days each and begin on June 13, with themes that include, “Battle Bots,” “Learn to Code with Minecraft,” “Legos in Motion,” “Video Game Design,” and Lego Engineering.” Register by clicking here, or reach out at [email protected] for more info.


Artistic Endeavors

Kimball Art Center
1401 Kearns Boulevard
Park City, UT  84060
435-649-8882

Each year, the Kimball Art Center offers summer camps taught by professional, practicing artists with teaching experience, featuring a curriculum vetted to inspire, educate and foster an appreciation for art in all of its forms. No camps have been listed for this summer, as yet, but you can visit their website by clicking here to check for updated information or visit their Facebook page here.

Photo Credit: Egyptian Youtheatre

Egyptian Theatre Youtheatre
Mary G. Steiner Egyptian Theatre
328 Main Street
Park City, UT 84060
435-296-SING (7464)
[email protected]

Each summer, Park City’s Historic Mary G. Steiner Egyptian Theatre hosts summer camps for students have included themes in the past like “Improv Puppetry,” “Bilingual Film Camp,” and “Podcast Radio Drama Camp.” The daylong camps offer students of varying ages the chance to stretch their creative skills in a peer-supportive environment, taking advantage of the Egyptian’s studios on upper Main Street. While 2022 camp information has not yet been posted, keep an eye on their website or Instagram page for announcements.


Park City School District
(Various locations around Park City)
435-645-5617

Park City School District offers a full summer of courses through their Leisure Learning department, with opportunities ranging from arts and crafts to coding and babysitter training. The full catalog and class details usually go online at the end of March and can be found by clicking here, or by emailing Jane Toly at [email protected].


Natural History Museum of Utah
301 Wakara Way
Salt Lake City, UT  84108
801-581-6927

Natural History Museum of Utah’s (NHMU) weekly camps are for students in grades kindergarten through 6th, and opened for registration to Copper Club Members on Feb. 28, while Museum Members at the Family level and above can register on March 3, and all others on March 8. Held at the impressive NHMU facility on the University of Utah campus in Salt Lake City, camps run every week between June 6 and August 8 (except for the week of July 4 & 25 due to holidays), and include days at nearby locations (past partners include Red Butte Garden, This is the Place, Utah’s Hogle Zoo and Tracy Aviary). To get a sneak peak of this year’s camps as soon as they’re published, register for NHMU emails by clicking here.


Utah’s Hogle Zoo
2600 Sunnyside Avenue (840 South)
Salt Lake City, UT. 84108
801-584-1700

Utah’s Hogle Zoo presents weekly onsite and virtual summer camp options for kids entering grades 1st through 8th, with past themes including “Ecosystems of the Globe,” “Animals on the Move,” and “Curious Creatures and Fearsome Features.” Registration info will be available soon, but you can check out the dates and camps by clicking here.

Sleepaway (Near By)

Photo Credit: YMCA of Northern Utah

For many local kids, their first overnight camp experience happens close to home through the YMCA’s Camp Roger (on Mirror Lake Highway just past Kamas) and the Girl Scouts’ Camp Cloud Rim (above the Montage in upper Deer Valley). Camp Roger offers week-long camps throughout the summer for ages 6-15, featuring mountain biking, hiking, archery, arts and crafts, and horseback riding beginning June 5. This year’s themes include, “Disney,” “Mission Impossible,” “Under the Sea,” and “Neon Lights.” Camp Cloud Rim offers an idyllic, lakeside setting at 9,200 feet, where girls entering grades 1-12 can experience week-long, themed camps, such as “Flashlights and Fairy Tales,” “Teddy Bear Tag-a-long,” “Moonlight Mania,” and “Boats and Brunches.” Cloud Rim offers 3-day “mini” versions of camps for younger girls to get them used to being away from home in a camp setting. Registration is now open for both camps, and can be found here for Camp Roger, or here for Camp Cloud Rim.

Diverse and enriching summer camp options are one of the many reasons to Choose Park City for your Park City Real Estate investment. Be sure to connect with Christine today at 435-640-4238 to explore future adventures of your own! 

Getting Kids into the Volunteer Spirit!

Cultivating altruism in our children can start at any age, and with so many deserving nonprofits serving the Wasatch Back and Salt Lake Valley, opportunities suitable for kids of all ages abound. And while many in-person volunteer opportunities have a minimum age requirement of 14-to-16 years old, there are other ways for kids of all ages to give back, including those listed below!

Operation Hope Holiday Cheer for Local Families

Photo credit: CCPC

The Christian Center of Park City (CCPC) helps to provide a happy holiday each year for families in Summit and Wasatch counties through their Operation Hope event. In Summit County, Operation Hope takes the form of a toy store for families to “shop” for gifts for their kids, while in Summit County, $75 gift cards are given to parents to use for gifts. Families in need register in advance, and 2,000 children in Wasatch and Summit counties were served through the program last year. For the Park City toy store, donations needed include new toys, books and winter clothing, which kids can help gather items by visiting their neighbors or putting up flyers in centralized neighborhood locations inviting friends, fellow residents and family members to drop off items or gift cards at your house or business. These items can then be dropped off at CCPCs offices in Park City or at Center Stage in Heber City during the week up until December 8th to give them plenty of time to distribute to the families. For more information, click here.

Kids can also gather the makings of Birthday Boxes for kids in-need throughout the year, which include a boxed cake mix, frosting, small container of sprinkles, cupcake liners/papers, party paper plates, balloons and party favors. The boxes can be dropped off at either CCPC in Park City or Center Stage in Heber City.

Creating Food/Snack Bags for Fellow Students

For many students, breakfast and lunch at school are the only nutritious meals they receive each day. That’s why the Wasatch Community Foundation in Heber City is creating 1,600 food bags to provide to 800 children in Wasatch County to assist with food scarcity over the Christmas Break. Volunteers of all ages can help assemble the bags on Dec. 10 and 11 by signing up here.

Photo credit: Intermountain Health Care

Intermountain Park City and Heber Valley Hospital Volunteers

Kids ages 14 and older can volunteer at the Park City or Heber City hospital locations, with duties including delivering flowers and letters to patients, greeting and directing patients and visitors, and serving as liaison in the Emergency Room and Same Day Surgery waiting rooms. Volunteers much commit to working two hours per week for a minimum of six months, ad must comply with health requirements for vaccinations and immunizations. Click on the links above for each location to learn more.

Welcome Kits for Refugees

Utah has long been a safe haven for refugees from other countries, with an estimated 60,000 displaced individuals currently residing here, including nearly 800 recently welcomed from Afghanistan who were granted “humanitarian parole” due to threats to their safety. Kids can collect items and package Baby Kits for Refugees through Lifting Hands International, with each essentials kit comprised of baby wipes, a baby bottle, baby spoons and a thermometer (a baby toy or blanket is also welcomed). To donate to the Heber City location, click here, or call Jamie at 480-516-3237. Other types of kits needed include cooking/utensil kits, cleaning kits, winter kids and women’s hygiene kits.

Photo credit: The Road Home

Helping the Homeless

In the Salt Lake Valley, the Road Home, which provides emergency shelter and other services, has in-person volunteer opportunities for kids ages 12 and older, including helping to serve meals, and at the warehouse sorting donations and organizing clothing. For more information and to sign up to volunteer, click here.

Primary Children’s Volunteers

Volunteers ages 16 and older can help at Primary Children’s Hospital in areas like the Gift Shop, Information Desk, Kids Crew and Children’s Outpatient Rehabilitation Services. Volunteers must commit to one 3-hour shift per week, pass a background check and be current on immunizations (among other requirements), and can learn more by clicking here, or by calling Volunteer Services at 801-662-6560.

The community dedication to volunteerism and charity is one of the many reasons so many people Choose Park City. Connect with Christine Grenney at 435-640-4238, or visiting her website by clicking here to learn about the many ways locals and visitors engage in charitable endeavors.

Reduce and Reuse Outgrown Winter Gear

Based on the rate at which our kids grow out of ski gear, many parents choose to sign up for ski shop rental programs where boots and skis or boards are traded in each year for a bigger size. But for families that have invested in gear, including coats, gloves, etc., finding an outlet for upcycling those items can be challenging, which creates a great opportunity for kids of any age to collect the items from friends and neighbors to give to families in our community who might not be able to afford new snow gear for their children this year.

While most of our schools hold coat drives or have bins in their entryways to accept winter gear around this time each year, I’ve pulled together a few additional places where coats and ski items can be taken directly.

Photo credit: CCPC

The Christian Center of Park City (CCPC) accepts gently used items for resale at their stores in Park City and Heber, with specific drop-off hours and locations listed here. Clothing and recreation/sports equipment are included in their list of Top 5 Donation Needs, along with a list of unacceptable donations. Many locals (and, oftentimes visitors who’ve forgotten some items) rely on the CCPC’s stores to score deals and steals, and the money raised funds their critical programs, including food, mental health, and seasonal worker supports.

St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Old Town also accepts items for resale at its St. Lawrence Thrift Store in Heber, with drop-off times on Monday-Saturday from 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Photo credit: Youth Sports Alliance

According to Heather Sims, Youth Programs Director for Youth Sports Alliance (YSA), which runs the Get Out and Play programs at each school, YSA will accept gently used ski jackets, pants, goggles and mittens. These donations will ensure students who are unable to afford warm and appropriate outerwear for the organization’s amazing programs that introduce hundreds of local students to winter sports will be able to participate. She further noted, however, that YSA has stopped taking helmets this year, and they are unable to accept skis/boards or boots due to both storage and liability issues. Donations of soft goods can be dropped off at CCPC (1283 Deer Valley Drive), Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. – 3 p.m, and on Saturdays from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Items will be distributed to YSA scholarship recipients during Operation Hope later this month. Donations of new items made through YSA’s Amazon Wish List will be delivered directly to their offices.

The Park City High School PTO has set up a donation portal for contributions to the Park City Learning Center (PCLC) at Park City High School, but they are seeking new items to provide students with the appropriate winter attire for their Adventure PE and PCLC Wellness Programs. If you have items that you purchased but never got around to wearing, or if you’re out and about and find a great deal on outwear that will provide students who don’t have the appropriate gear to participate in outdoor programs, this is the opportunity for you! They are accepting items up until Winter Break on Dec. 17, with more info available by clicking here.

In Wasatch County, donations are currently being accepted for the Heber Valley 5th Annual Community Clothing & Toy Exchange, with a drop-off day scheduled for Dec. 3 from 10 a.m. – 7 p.m. at the Wasatch County Rec Center (345 W. 600 S, #500, Heber City). Donations can also be dropped off in advance at the Wasatch County Health Department, located at 55 South 500 East in Heber City. Community members are then invited in to pick up items they need the following day.

If you’re in Salt Lake, The Road Home shelter accepts gently-used items to help provide warm clothing for individuals seeking emergency shelter and housing assistance, while the Crossroads Urban Center Thrift Store accepts clothing and household essentials, which are then provided at no cost through a voucher program for low-income families. Deseret Industries (the “DI”) accepts donations of used clothing and sporting equipment for resale in their retail locations, with proceeds going to programs that provide job training, career, and technical education, and community grants to underserved populations.

When it comes to giving back to our neighbors, few communities measure up to the Greater Park City area, which is one of the many reasons so many people Choose Park City. Connect with Christine Grenney at 435-640-4238, or visiting her website by clicking here to learn about more about the area.

The Future of Learning for Park City School District

https://www.friendsofparkcityeducation.com/

Since arriving in Park City 19 years ago, I’ve witnessed exponential growth and have seen the many ways it has affected our school environments. As Parkites, we’ve long been told (and do believe) that Park City School District (PCSD) is No. 1 in the state, but with aging buildings and crowded classrooms, the District has decided it’s time to reevaluate our learning spaces and what they should like to best serve our students today and in the future.

That decision led to The Future of Learning master planning project, encompassing years of community meetings, building evaluations and long-range planning to determine things such as: What grades should be in which buildings, which buildings can be renovated and which should be torn down, and the actual classroom learning environments that best serve the education of our nearly 5,000 students.

Like all investments, executing the recommendations within the Future of Learning comes with a cost, which is being put in front of all voters within the Park City School District boundaries (zip codes 84060, 84068, and 84098) on this November’s ballot. In Utah, the primary mechanism for funding school capital projects is through bond initiatives. While other entities – power, parks, water, sewer, etc. – can impose impact fees to lessen the impact of growth brought by new construction, school districts are legally prohibited from doing so, which means bond initiatives must be presented to voters to spread the cost of school district projects across taxpayers via property tax increases.

The specific goals of the Future of Learning project funded by the proposed bond, according to PCSD’s site, include:

Comprehensive 4-Year High School Experience – Community and faculty feedback overwhelmingly support providing a comprehensive 4-year high school experience.

Career and Technical Education (CTE) Enhancements – Community members expressed strong interest in bolstering CTE offerings and building on the success of PCCAPS in the renovation at both the high school and middle school. The District has seen that 95% of CTE students graduate from high school, which is 10% higher than the national average.

Full Middle School Experience – Community feedback supported the 8th grade students attending a middle school model at Ecker Hill Middle School.

Strengthen Community Services – The community and District leaders are strongly committed to providing early learning opportunities to all students in recognition of the importance of early learning to student success, social equity and closing the achievement gap. Neighborhood elementary schools will have early learning opportunities incorporated with wraparound community services at key locations in the District.

I encourage you to visit the school district’s FAQs page by clicking here. It breaks down the bond process and answers complex questions to help voters further understand the impact of the election. More information can also be found here, including upcoming community informational meeting dates. As the educational and emotional outcomes of our students become increasingly critical, re-envisioning the spaces where they spend so much of their developmental time has never been more crucial.  

A supported and educated community is one of the many reasons so many people Choose Park City. Connect with Christine Grenney at 435-640-4238, or visiting her website by clicking here to learn about the many mountain properties providing easy access to each of the state’s resort communities.

Fall Fun for Everyone!

With many of last fall’s family activities scrapped or downsized due to the pandemic, this year’s slate of festive happenings is robust, and rightly so!

Photo credit: Visit Park City

Dress-Up Days

Get a head start on dressing up at the Egyptian Theatre’s “Halloween Spooktacular!” by YouTheatre, bringing the classic stories of Dracula and Frankenstein to life on the Egyptian Studios’ stage. Billed as “a little bit spooky, a little bit silly,” the event is held Oct. 29 – 31, with tickets available by clicking here. The Egyptian is also hosting an “Evil Dead Film Fest,” hosted by “Evil Dead” star, Bruce Campbell. From Oct. 29-31, the Festival will feature the films, “Evil Dead,” “Evil Dead II,” “Army of Darkness,” and “My Name is Bruce.”

Basin Recreation’s “Celebrate the Spirits” event will be on Saturday, Oct. 30 from 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. For $15 per individual or $40 per family, revelers of all ages can enjoy trick-or-treating, costume contests, festive activities, and local vendors. Click here to learn more and purchase tickets.

The DeJoria Center in Kamas is hosting a Trunk or Treat on Oct. 30 from 3:30 – 6 p.m., with free admission and food/drinks available from the State Road Food Wagon. Families are invited to participate with their vehicle and enough treats to go around!

And it’s official! One of the most beloved locals’ events in Park City is back – Halloween on Main Street will be held on Oct. 31 from 3-5 p.m. This popular and highly anticipated event features storefronts up and down Main offering goodies to local ghouls and goblins, capped off at 5 p.m. with the Dog Parade on Lower Main Street. Leashed, costumed dogs and their owners should meet at 4:45 below the Lower Main Street Pedestrian Bridge, from which they will march to Heber Avenue. As with all Old Town events, everyone is encouraged to walk, bike, carpool or take Park City Transit to Main Street, with doggies welcome on the busses with their owners. For more information, click here.

Photo credit: American West Heritage Center

Pumpkin Picking

Nothing says “fall” quite like visiting a pumpkin patch on a mission to find the most fitting candidate for your family’s front porch jack-o’-lanterns!

As part of the ongoing transformation of the former Park City Nursery into the expanded Park City Gardens, a Pumpkin Patch and Haunted Forest has opened for the month of October. Admission is free, but a donation to the Utah Food Bank is encouraged. Hours are Monday – Saturday from 9 a.m.-5 p.m., and on Sundays from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Park City Municipal is inviting everyone to show off their spooky pumpkin creations at the inaugural community Pumpkin Stroll, scheduled for Thursday, Oct. 28, at the Bonanza Art Park (corner of Munchkin Road and Bonanza Drive). Participants can drop-off an already-carved pumpkin at the Art Park between 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. on Oct. 28, then all submitted jack-o’-lanterns will be lit and placed around the park for community viewing from 4 – 7 p.m. Costumes are encouraged, with planned activities including pumpkin painting, piñata making, face painting and spooky tunes with DJ Funky Boss, lawn games, and beer garden.

In Wasatch County, Kohler Creamery hosts is Hay Maze and Pumpkin Patch, featuring a maze constructed from more than 100 straw bales on this working dairy farm, and the opportunity to select that perfect pumpkin to take home. Prices are $8.99 per person for the maze and pumpkin, or $11.99 for a VIP experience when you add on some yummy Aggies Ice Cream. Heber Valley Artisan Cheese curds, soups and grilled cheese sandwiches are also available for purchase. This attraction operates through Oct. 30 from Monday through Saturday during business hours (10 a.m. – 6 p.m.).

With more than 55 attractions in one location, Cornbelly’s in Lehi at Thanksgiving Point offers up a massive corn maze, apple blasters, duck races, a giant slide, a ropes course, hayrides, farm golf, and a cow train, among other family-friendly activities. Activities such as paintball, face painting, a u-pick pumpkin patch and a carousel are available for an extra fee. Cornbelly’s is open Monday-Saturday through Oct. 30, with extended hours until midnight on Fridays and Saturdays.    

If you’re up for driving to bucolic Cache County (70 miles north of Salt Lake City), the American West Heritage Center holds activities throughout October, earning it Reader’s Digest’s “Best Pumpkin Patch” honors for Utah. While the Fall Harvest Festival is held Oct. 15 & 16, and includes opportunities to press fresh apple cider, make candles and take a turn in the BB shooting range, the Center’s daily activities also include pony and train rides, a seven-acre corn maze (closed Sundays) and “Haunted Hollow” on Friday and Saturday nights.

Fun and festive community celebrations are one of the many reasons so many people Choose Park City. Connect with Christine Grenney at 435-640-4238, or visiting her website by clicking here to learn about the many mountain properties providing easy access to each of the state’s resort communities.

The Scoop on Season Passes

Photo credit: Park City Mountain

With the final colors of fall clinging to the trees in and around Park City, thoughts naturally turn toward the very season that brought so many of us here: Winter!

As we all begin to pray for snow, it’s time to decide where to lock or strap in for the upcoming ski season.

But first, if you’re looking to score a sweet deal on gear, be sure to check out one of the many “swaps” happening locally. The locals’ favorite is the Park City Ski Swap, an event that benefits and is run by Park City Ski & Snowboard (PCSS). Held at Basin Recreation from November 5-7, the Park City Ski Swap is the single largest fundraiser for PCSS, supporting the nonprofit program’s mission of developing young athletes in Park City and the surrounding communities. Friday night is considered to be the best night for deals and steals, so purchase your tickets ASAP! The ever-resourceful Ski Utah has culled a list of all swaps at the following link: https://www.skiutah.com/resources/utah-ski-swap

Photo credit: Deer Valley Resort

Deer Valley Resort
Season: Dec. 4, 2021 – April 17, 2022

Deer Valley Resort generally serves as home base for my family, as their reputation for world-class customer service is matched only by their acres of skiable terrain, with everything from bowls to groomers offering that famed “Deer Valley Difference.”

Regarding COVID-19 guidelines, DVR is following CDC recommendations and requires all visitors to wear a facial covering indoors unless eating or drinking in a designated area, and must social distance when possible. Outside, vaccinated guests are not required to wear a face covering, while unvaccinated guests must wear one if unable to social distance.

Full Season Passes are outlined in the table below:

PASS NAMEOCTOBER 14 RATEOCTOBER 15 RATE
Adult (23-64 years)$2,550$2,965
Senior (65+ years)$1,910$2,220
Young Adult (13-22 years)$1,575$1,890
Child (5-12 years)$715$830
College Student$1,785$1,960
Military Season Pass$1,785$1,960
Tot Season Pass (4 and under)$175$200

New this year, Deer Valley is offering “First Tracks” on specified days, providing early lift access to season pass holders on Jan. 28, Feb. 11, and March 25, 2022, with three additional First Tracks days for both Deer Valley and IKON season pass holders on Jan. 12, Feb. 16 and March 2, 2022.

Season Pass holders also receive discounts on Friends & Family passes, a Monday-Friday complimentary day ticket at Alta, Brighton, and Snowbird, discounts at Deer Valley-owned restaurants and retail outlets, and a complimentary 2022 Summer Season Pass if a 21/22 Full Season Pass is purchased before the October 14 deadline.

Another option is the Mid-Week Season Pass, with access Monday through Friday (excluding 12/26/2021 – 1/2/2021) for just $1,395 before the October deadline, with the price increasing to $1,510 afterward.

The Ikon Pass also offers days of skiing at Deer Valley, along with other local resorts like Snowbasin, Snowbird and Alta, with more info available at ikonpass.com.

To purchase passes or learn more, click here.

Photo credit: Park City Mountain

Park City Mountain
Season: Nov. 19, 2021 – April 17, 2022

Heading into the upcoming ski season, Park City Mountain has eliminated the skier reservation system it put into place last year in response to COVID-19 and is offering a 20% discount on season passes until October 14. This means the full Epic Pass, with no holiday blackout dates and access to all Vail Resorts-owned properties, is just $799 for ages 13 and older, and $407 for children. The Epic Local Pass, which excludes holidays (though half-price day passes are available for blacked-out dates), is $599 for ages 19 and older, $479 for teens ages 13-18, and $311 for children. The Park City Youth Pass – with no black-out dates, but good only at Park City Mountain and not at other Vail Resorts – is $319 for kids ages 5-12. Kids four and younger are eligible for a free Epic pass. With prices increasing on October 14, now is the time to lock in the above prices.

Park City also offers multi-day Epic Passes, ranging from one to seven days, which are good at most Vail resorts in the U.S. and at Whistler/Blackcomb, and start at $89 for one day for skiers ages 13 and older, and $47 for one day for children ages 5-13. For every day added, the price per day decreases, with the daily price for the seven-day pass just $77 ($533 total), and holidays are excluded.

There will still be COVID-19 mitigation protocols in place, including face coverings required in indoor settings, such as restaurants, lodging properties, restrooms, busses, retail and rental locations. Face coverings will not be required outdoors, in lift lines, or on lifts or gondolas. They are still requiring reservations to eat at many of the on-mountain restaurants, and guests aged 12 and older will be required to show proof of COVID-19 vaccinations to dine at indoor or on-mountain cafeteria-style restaurants.  

Benefitting active duty and retired military who served at least 20 years, the Epic Military Pass is just $151, and includes all dependents.

All passes offer 20% discounts on food, retail, lessons, and rentals, plus seven days of unrestricted skiing or snowboarding at both Snowbasin and Sun Valley for full Epic Pass holders (Epic Local Pass holders receive two days with restricted dates).

Woodward

Located along I-80 between Kimball Junction and Summit Park, Woodward offers a small-mountain experience for skiers and snowboarders, with half-pipe and park access, plus lessons that typically cost less than at the larger resorts. While they haven’t yet included their 2021-22 winter operations info online, keep an eye on their site for info coming out soon!

Photo credit: Snowbird

Snowbird
Dec. 1, 2021 – May (or even July, depending on the snowpack …)

A short drive (depending on the day) to Little Cottonwood Canyon brings you to the mecca of the most serious of skiers and snowboarders: Snowbird (though there is accessible terrain for all levels).  

Snowbird offers a variety of pass products, including the all-in Summit Pass with no blackout dates (see prices below), the Ten-2-Share Pass with 10 days of unlimited access to the Tram and chairlifts for $699 (can be shared with family and friends), the Flex-4 Tix for four days of unlimited skiing/riding for $349 (perfect for trying out the mountain), or the Mountain Collective Pass for 46 days of access to 23 destinations for $589 for adults.

Summit Pass Type2021-22 Pass Price
Summit Adult$1,399
Summit Senior (65+)$1,079
Summit Young Adult (19-25)$1,079
Summit College/Medical Resident/Military$1,079
Summit Teen (13-18)$699
Summit Youth (7-12)$439
Summit 6 & Under$89
Summit 4-Pack (2 adults + 2 kids 18 & under)$2,799
Pricing is tax exclusive – tax rate of 7.25% not including Ikon Bass Pass add-on benefit.
Prices and benefits are valid through February 28, 2022.

The Alta-Bird pass is also a great way for skiers (no snowboarders allowed at Alta) to experience the best of both iconic resorts, with prices as follows:

Alta-Bird Pass Type2021-22 Pass Price
Alta-Bird Adult$1,999
Alta-Bird Senior (65+)$1,749
Alta-Bird Young Adult (18-25)$1,749
Alta-Bird Military$1,749
Alta-Bird Teen (13-17)$999
Alta-Bird Youth (7-12)$699
Alta-Bird 6 & Under$169
Alta-Bird 4-Pack (2 adults + 2 kids 17 & under)$4,199
Pricing is tax exclusive – tax rate of 7.25% not including Ikon Base add-on benefit.
Prices and benefits are valid through February 28, 2022.
Photo credit: Ski Utah

Ski Utah 5th & 6th Grade Passport

Much to the chagrin (and surprise) of many parents, the Ski Utah 5th & 6th Grade Passport was only valid on weekdays last season, but that restriction has been lifted for the upcoming season, and at an all-in cost of just $45, 5th Graders can ski or ride three times at EACH of Utah’s resorts for possibly the best value on the planet! The 6th Grade Passport is a little more modest with just one ticket at each mountain, but that’s still 15 days of skiing for just $15. You can make this year one to remember by also getting the Ski Utah Yeti Pass for $649 for yourself, which provides one ticket at each of Utah’s 15 resorts to accompany your little shredder. Talk about Bucket-List-level of parenting!

Other easily accessible resorts in Northern Utah include the budget-friendly Brighton, easy-to-navigate Solitude, charming Sundance and expansive Snowbasin. A great rundown of all pass products, courtesy of Ski Utah, can be found here.

Utah’s fabled “Greatest Snow on Earth” is one of the many reasons so many people Choose Park City. Connect with Christine Grenney at 435-640-4238, or visit her website by clicking here to learn about the many mountain properties providing easy access to each of the state’s resort communities.